Wednesday, 10 April 2019

The Golden Horsemen of Baghdad by Saviour Pirotta




review by Maryom

Since his father died, thirteen year old Jabir has become responsible for looking after his family, but, try as he might, he just can't catch fish the way his father could, so money for food and rent is short. Jabir decides the best thing is to seek work in the bustling city streets of Baghdad, but, arriving there tired and hungry, he steals a loaf and is arrested. Maybe he isn't quite as out of luck as he imagines as this leads to his wood-carving skills being noticed, and he's given a job by a clock-maker. Jabir is set the task of carving twelve horsemen, which will be gilded, and form part of an elaborate clock to be sent from the Grand Caliph Harun al Rashid to the Emperor Charlemagne in Europe. Someone, though, seems determined to sabotage his hard work. Can Jabir, with the help of the clock-maker's daughter Yasmina, found out who it is, and stop them?

Set in 798 CE, at the height of the Islamic Golden Age when Baghdad was a world-famous centre of learning and art, The Golden Horsemen of Baghdad is a compelling adventure story, in which a poor fisher-boy heads to the city looking for ways to support his family but is thwarted by the evil plans of someone with a grudge against his family. The story moves along quickly, and the reader will soon find themselves holding their breath and urging Jabir on as he encounters one set-back after another.



Aimed at Key Stage 2, children of seven and over, this book is part of Bloomsbury Education's Flashbacks series which aims to bring history (particularly the periods covered by the National Curriculum) to life for young readers. As such, it's a great introduction to the Islamic Golden Age, to the sights and scents of Baghdad's streets and workshops, and the perils of the desert which surround it, but, with vivid story-telling and characters that children can relate to, it's easy to forget that this is part of a history lesson.



Maryom's review - 5 stars
Publisher - Bloomsbury
Genre - historical fiction, 7+, Key Stage 2

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